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Is now the right time for a career change?

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Is now the right time for a career change?

Karen Lloyd marketing recruitment, retention, Career...

I love a podcast.  Whether thought provoking or slightly random; I’m there. 
 
I listened to one the other day that stuck with me – why now is a good time for a career change.
 
My initial reaction was, “WHAT!?”  We are in an employment market that is changing rapidly, people are nervous about what is ahead, and you are recommending moving into a totally new field where you have no experience?
 
After some (virtual) office debate, I thought I’d ask you lovely lot what you think.  
 
According to our social polls, 48% of you voted to take the risk!
It got me thinking.  If you are in a secure role, then this might be a risky move.  It depends on what field you want to go into and your transferable skill sets, as well as the level you expect to enter at.  
 
If, however, you have been made redundant, lost your job or look likely to do so and an opportunity comes your way then why not grab it with both hands?
 
Advice for a marketing career change
As so many of you were open to the idea, I thought I’d put together the things I advise people to think about if they are considering a career change, whether into, or out of marketing.
 
  1. Assess your risk.  This is critical.  Can you afford to take it, from a financial and personal perspective?  
     
  2. Consider your skill set.  Does new field utilise your existing skills?  Do you need to retrain?  If so, can you afford to do so?  Moving from marketing to journalism for example has some synergies, but marketing to teaching?  Totally different ball game.
     
  3. Can you gain experience before you move?  Dependant on what you want to do, can you get some experience in a voluntary capacity or in your spare time?  
     
  4. At what seniority can you practically expect to enter at?  You may need to come back down the ladder to gain entry to a new field.  Can you afford to do so?  Can you work at a more junior level again?
     
  5. Manage your expectations.  It may be a long slog; the importance of experience to hiring managers is high and finding one willing to take a risk on you may take longer than you expect.
 
Realistically, you need to be sure of your opportunity before you take the plunge in an uncertain labour market. 
 
It may be safer to be conservative and stay where you are for the time being, dependant on your circumstances. 
 
But if the time is right, and the right opportunity comes your way, you never know where it might lead you.